Animals in Hot Cars

After seeing this clip:

 

 

 

I wanted to share the information about what to do if you see an animal in a car during the summer:

Taken from http://barkpost.com/dogs-in-cars-2/

Pet-plan-car-infographic


Basics to know:

(Taken from http://aldf.org/press-room/press-releases/how-to-legally-help-dogs-in-hot-cars-this-summer/)

If you see an animal in distress, call 911.

Most states allow a public safety officer to break into the car and rescue an animal if its life is threatened. Calling 911 is the first step to saving that animal’s life.

Know your state laws.

More and more states are adopting “hot car” laws that prohibit leaving a companion animal unattended in a parked vehicle, with six enacted in just the last two years and two more pending.

Although 20 states have some form of “hot car” laws, the laws differ drastically from place to place:

  • Only two states—Wisconsin and Tennessee—have “good Samaritan” laws that allow any person to break a car window to save a pet.
  • In 16 states, only public officials such as law enforcement and humane officers can legally break into a car to rescue an animal (Arizona, California. Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Washington)
  • In New Jersey and West Virginia, no one has the authority to break into a vehicle to save an animal, not even law enforcement.
  • Legislation is pending in Florida and New York to give would give any concerned bystander the legal right to help an animal in distress. Pending legislation in Pennsylvania would make it illegal to confine a dog or cat in a vehicle in conditions that would jeopardize its health but only a police, public safety, or humane officer would have the legal right to rescue the animal.

Penalties for hot car deaths of companion animals are still limited. Most states limit penalties to misdemeanors or civil fines and infractions, even for repeat offenders. Maine and South Dakota’s laws don’t impose a penalty at all.

Let people know it’s not okay to leave their pet unattended in a car.

When an animal dies in a hot car, most of their humans say they left them “just for a minute.” If you see someone leave their pet in a parked car, tell them that even if it’s a pleasant day outside, the temperature inside the car can skyrocket fast. Cracking a window doesn’t eliminate the risk of heatstroke or death.


 

If your state allows you to break the window to rescue the animal here are some of the things you should do:

 

  • Checked to make sure the vehicle is actually locked
  • Have a reasonable belief, based upon the known circumstance, that entering into the vehicle is necessary because the vulnerable person or domestic animal is in imminent danger of suffering harm
  • Called 911 or law enforcement either before or immediately after breaking into the vehicle
  • Use only the necessary amount of force to break in.
  • Remain with the person, child or animal until first-responders arrive on the scene

 

I am happy to say that Florida just signed the bill back on March 2016 that will allow you to break into vehicles to rescue animals and people.

Taken from: http://miamiherald.typepad.com/nakedpolitics/2016/03/its-now-legal-in-florida-to-break-into-hot-cars-to-help-vulnerable-people-pets.html

 

The new law is in direct response to a growing number of incidents where pets, children and others have died because they’ve been left in overheated cars, particularly under Florida’s steamy summer sun.

 


 

So please please if you are going to take your dog with you, make sure they can go into the store if not leave them home in the A/C. And if you see a dog in a car on hot day, call it in.

Remember you could be the one to save the dog’s life.