Thankful Thursday

Today I am thankful we have no storm damage.

The house I own sits on an incline which backs up to a lake (more like a pond, but it has an official name), I am really thankful there is no storm damage and for the most part my friends and co-workers were fine.

So I’m thankful for that.

 

 

Animals in Hot Cars

After seeing this clip:

 

 

 

I wanted to share the information about what to do if you see an animal in a car during the summer:

Taken from http://barkpost.com/dogs-in-cars-2/

Pet-plan-car-infographic


Basics to know:

(Taken from http://aldf.org/press-room/press-releases/how-to-legally-help-dogs-in-hot-cars-this-summer/)

If you see an animal in distress, call 911.

Most states allow a public safety officer to break into the car and rescue an animal if its life is threatened. Calling 911 is the first step to saving that animal’s life.

Know your state laws.

More and more states are adopting “hot car” laws that prohibit leaving a companion animal unattended in a parked vehicle, with six enacted in just the last two years and two more pending.

Although 20 states have some form of “hot car” laws, the laws differ drastically from place to place:

  • Only two states—Wisconsin and Tennessee—have “good Samaritan” laws that allow any person to break a car window to save a pet.
  • In 16 states, only public officials such as law enforcement and humane officers can legally break into a car to rescue an animal (Arizona, California. Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Washington)
  • In New Jersey and West Virginia, no one has the authority to break into a vehicle to save an animal, not even law enforcement.
  • Legislation is pending in Florida and New York to give would give any concerned bystander the legal right to help an animal in distress. Pending legislation in Pennsylvania would make it illegal to confine a dog or cat in a vehicle in conditions that would jeopardize its health but only a police, public safety, or humane officer would have the legal right to rescue the animal.

Penalties for hot car deaths of companion animals are still limited. Most states limit penalties to misdemeanors or civil fines and infractions, even for repeat offenders. Maine and South Dakota’s laws don’t impose a penalty at all.

Let people know it’s not okay to leave their pet unattended in a car.

When an animal dies in a hot car, most of their humans say they left them “just for a minute.” If you see someone leave their pet in a parked car, tell them that even if it’s a pleasant day outside, the temperature inside the car can skyrocket fast. Cracking a window doesn’t eliminate the risk of heatstroke or death.


 

If your state allows you to break the window to rescue the animal here are some of the things you should do:

 

  • Checked to make sure the vehicle is actually locked
  • Have a reasonable belief, based upon the known circumstance, that entering into the vehicle is necessary because the vulnerable person or domestic animal is in imminent danger of suffering harm
  • Called 911 or law enforcement either before or immediately after breaking into the vehicle
  • Use only the necessary amount of force to break in.
  • Remain with the person, child or animal until first-responders arrive on the scene

 

I am happy to say that Florida just signed the bill back on March 2016 that will allow you to break into vehicles to rescue animals and people.

Taken from: http://miamiherald.typepad.com/nakedpolitics/2016/03/its-now-legal-in-florida-to-break-into-hot-cars-to-help-vulnerable-people-pets.html

 

The new law is in direct response to a growing number of incidents where pets, children and others have died because they’ve been left in overheated cars, particularly under Florida’s steamy summer sun.

 


 

So please please if you are going to take your dog with you, make sure they can go into the store if not leave them home in the A/C. And if you see a dog in a car on hot day, call it in.

Remember you could be the one to save the dog’s life.

Thankful Thursday

So today I’m thankful for Buttercup… the newest additional to the household, she’s the most timid, quiet member and I believe that she was abused as she flinched when I went to touch her. Mind you, I always let her sniff me before I touch her.

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She came up to me last week while I was sitting on the couch in the den, I invited her up and she hopped up in my lap and let me just pet her. She was purring but very very softly. I had to leave my hand on her back just to tell.

She left for a bit and came back about twenty minutes later and stayed for a bit longer.

 

I was so very worried/concerned/nervous after the vet visit she was panting and drooling after picking her up from her vet/grooming.  13346800_10154238354603252_8997404894449407459_n

Poor sweetie had mats in her fur and I wanted a professional to take care of it.

But she was put in the master bathroom for a few hours and checked on repeatedly and was fine.

 

So I’m thankful for her coming around to me.

I’m going to still work with her, she’s letting me pet her and comes up when she wants attention and it’s just an awesome feeling.

🙂

 

What are you thankful for?

 

Hurricane Preparedness for Pets

I live in Florida, which means from June 1st to November 30th we are subject to tropical depressions/storms/hurricanes.

For those that don’t know what they are or have gone through them, it’s a disturbance in the Atlantic Ocean that forms as it travels along and brings lots of rain, wind, storm surge (due to the wind pushing the water onshore), tornadoes/ water spouts and lightning.

It can be an frightening experience for humans, but imagine your pets.

So today, in light of the fact that the Tampa Bay area is currently under tropical storm warning I wanted to share some tips/hints and checklists that will help you keep your furry, feathered and scaled friends safe this Hurricane Season:

 

Start getting ready now

(taken from: http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/animal_rescue/tips/pets-disaster.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/)

ID your pet

Make sure that cats and dogs are wearing collars and identification tags that are up to date. You’ll increase your chances of being reunited with pets who get lost by having themmicrochipped; make sure the microchip registration is in your name. But remember: The average citizen who finds your pet won’t be able to scan for a chip, but they will probably be able to read a basic tag!

Put your cell phone number on your pet’s tag. It may also be a good idea to include the phone number of a friend or relative outside your immediate area—in case you have had to evacuate.

Put together your disaster kit

Use our checklist to assemble an emergency kit for yourself and your pet.

Find a safe place to stay ahead of time

Never assume that you will be allowed to bring your pet to an emergency shelter. Before a disaster hits, call your local office of emergency management to see if you will be allowed to evacuate with your pets and verify that there will be shelters in your area that take people and their pets.

Contact hotels and motels outside your immediate area to find out if they accept pets. Ask about any restrictions on number, size and species. Inquire if a “no pet” policy would be waived in an emergency. Keep a list of animal-friendly places handy, and call ahead for a reservation as soon as you think you might have to leave your home.

For help identifying pet-friendly lodgings, check out these websites:

Make arrangements with friends or relatives. Ask people outside your immediate area if they would be able to shelter you and your pets—or just your pets—if necessary. If you have more than one pet, you may need to arrange to house them at separate locations.

Consider a kennel or veterinarian’s office. Make a list of boarding facilities and veterinary offices that might be able to shelter animals in disaster emergencies (make sure to include their 24-hour telephone numbers).

Check with your local animal shelter. Some shelters may be able to provide foster care or shelter for pets in an emergency. But keep in mind that shelters have limited resources and are likely to be stretched during a local emergency.

Plan for your pet in case you’re not home

In case you’re away during a disaster or evacuation order, make arrangements well in advance for someone you trust to take your pets and meet you at a specified location. Be sure the person is comfortable with your pets and your pets are familiar with them. Give your emergency caretaker a key to your home and show them where your pets are likely to be (especially if they hide when they’re nervous) and where your disaster supplies are kept.

If you have a pet-sitter, they may be able to help. Discuss the possibility well in advance.

If you evacuate, take your pet

Rule number one: If it isn’t safe for you, it isn’t safe for your pets. You have no way of knowing how long you’ll be kept out of the area, and you may not be able—or allowed—to go back for your pets. Pets left behind in a disaster can easily be injured, lost or killed.
Pledge to take your pet with you when disaster strikes.

Rule number two: Evacuate early. Don’t wait for a mandatory evacuation order. Some people who have waited to be evacuated by emergency officials have been told to leave their pets behind. The smell of smoke or the sound of high winds or thunder may make your pet more fearful and difficult to load into a crate or carrier. Evacuating before conditions become severe will keep everyone safer and make the process less stressful.

If you stay home, do it safely

If your family and pets must wait out a storm or other disaster at home, identify a safe area of your home where you can all stay together.

  • Close off or eliminate unsafe nooks and crannies where frightened cats may try to hide.
  • Move dangerous items such as tools or toxic products that have been stored in the area.
  • Bring your pets indoors as soon as local authorities say trouble is on the way. Keep dogs on leashes and cats in carriers, and make sure they are wearing identification.
  • If you have a room you can designate as a “safe room,” put your emergency supplies in that room in advance, including your pet’s crate and supplies. Have any medications and a supply of pet food and water inside watertight containers, along with your other emergency supplies. If there is an open fireplace, vent, pet door or similar opening in the house, close it off with plastic sheeting and strong tape.
  • Listen to the radio periodically, and don’t come out until you know it’s safe.

After the disaster

Your home may be a very different place after the emergency is over, and it may be hard for your pets to adjust.

  • Don’t allow your pets to roam loose. Familiar landmarks and smells might be gone, and your pet will probably be disoriented. Pets can easily get lost in such situations.
  • While you assess the damage, keep dogs on leashes and cats in carriers inside the house. If your house is damaged, your pets could escape.
  • Be patient with your pets after a disaster. Try to get them back into their normal routines as soon as possible. Be ready for behavioral problems caused by the stress of the situation. If these problems persist, or if your pet seems to be having any health problems, talk to your veterinarian.
  • If your community has been flooded, check your home and yard for wild animals who may have sought refuge there. Wildlife can pose a threat to you and your pet. Check out our tips for humanely evicting wildlife.

Be ready for everyday emergencies

You can’t get home to your pet

There may be times that you can’t get home to take care of your pets. Icy roads may trap you at the office overnight, an accident may send you to the hospital—things happen. But you can make sure your pets get the care they need by making arrangements now:

  • Find a trusted neighbor, friend or family member and give him or her a key. Make sure this backup caretaker is comfortable and familiar with your pets (and vice versa).
  • Make sure your backup caretaker knows your pets’ feeding and medication schedule, whereabouts and habits.
  • If you use a pet-sitting service, find out in advance if they will be able to help in case of an emergency.

Heat wave

High temperatures can be dangerous. Learn more about hot weather safety for pets.

The electricity goes out

If you’re forced to leave your home because you’ve lost electricity, take your pets with you to a pet-friendly hotel. If it’s summer, even just an hour or two in the sweltering heat can be dangerous. If you stay at home during a summer power outage, ask your local emergency management office if there are pet-friendly cooling centers in the area.

If it’s winter, don’t be fooled by your pets’ fur coats; it isn’t safe to leave them in an unheated house.

 

Let’s start with the basic disaster kit:

 

 

hurricanelist

(taken from: http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/animal_rescue/tips/pet_disaster_preparedness_kit.html?credit=web_id354243830)

Here’s a great little video:

Additional Items to have:

 

  • Newspapers
  • Paper towels
  • Plastic trash bags
  • Grooming items
  • Household bleach

 

You take also take the Pledge to take your pet with you.

Also helpful is a list of pet friendly places to take your animals in the event you have to evacuate:

 

 

Also for those taking care of community cats (taken from http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/feral_cats/tips/disasters_care_outdoor_cats.html?credit=web_id354243830) :

 

What to do right now

  • Create (and update) a list—complete with descriptions and photos—of all the cats in the colony you care for. After a storm, this list may help you locate displaced cats and recover those being cared for by shelters or other rescue groups.
  • Find someone who will commit to being a back-up caretaker in your absence.
  • Carry the contact information for your secondary caretaker in your wallet. Also post the information on your refrigerator or some other visible place in your home.
  • Gather and have on hand the contact information for local shelters and rescue groups. They may be able to help you locate cats who have gone missing.

What to do when bad weather threatens your community cats

  • Secure or remove objects (such as chairs, potted plants or garden utensils) in and near the colony that could become airborne during high winds or get washed away.
  • Move shelters and feeding stations to higher ground in areas that may flood. Raise shelters and feeding stations to keep them dry. You’ll find wooden shipping pallets, available at some lumber yards, are ideal for this purpose.
  • Tie shelters and feeders to permanent structures (like a fence or a sturdy tree) to anchor them, or wedge them tightly into a secure space. Be careful about placing heavy objects (e.g., bricks, boards or rocks) on top of shelters to keep them in place, as these may pose a danger in high winds.
  • Keep rain out by positioning shelters so their openings face a wall or so that the entrances of two shelters face each other, no more than a foot apart.
  • Cover shelters and feeding stations with heavy tarps to keep out driving rain. Tie tarps at an angle and extend any overhang over shelter doors so water can run off and away from shelter doors. Hammer stakes securely and/or tie the tarps to a permanent structure.
  • Leave extra dry food in covered feeding stations in case you can’t return soon, and place extra kibble inside the cats’ shelter, as far from the openings as possible. Don’t put water in the shelter—it’s important that the shelter and cats remain warm and dry.
  • Lay Mylar blankets inside the shelters for extra warmth.
  • Put portable shelters, litter boxes, food and water in an accessible shed or garage during the storm.
  • Stockpile adequate cat food, bottled water, extra batteries and flashlights.
  • If possible, trap the friendly cats and kittens young enough to be socialized prior to the storm and take them to a safe place. Don’t try to trap or contain feral cats; they are too frightened of humans to be handled.

What to do when it’s safe to return to your community cat colony

Contact your local police precinct to gain access to your colony if it’s in an area with restricted access. Then, restore a normal environment and feeding routine as soon as possible in order to help draw the cats back.

How to find the missing community cats

  • Search above ground level: The cats may have climbed high to escape flood waters.
  • Don’t panic if you can’t find all the cats at once. They are probably close but are too frightened to return to their home. Most cats will return within a week, but some may take a few weeks to come back.
  • Offer tempting foods such as canned tuna or rotisserie chicken to coax frightened cats into returning.
  • Provide government agencies and organizations assisting animals with information about cats you’re missing, and find out how to claim the cats if they’re found.
  • Search for missing cats at local shelters and find out how you can claim your cats.

How to restore order to the cats’ home

  • Be cautious of branches and other debris that may continue to fall after the storm has ended.
  • Remove broken lumber and glass, nails or other sharp objects to prevent injury and infection.
  • Repair damaged feeding stations and shelters. Rebuild shelters, if necessary. Clean out and replace wet insulation materials (straw, newspaper or linens).
  • Disinfect shelters, feeding stations and dishes if they were exposed to flood waters. Use a non-toxic, cat-safe disinfectant. (Check with your veterinarian or animal shelter to see what products are safe.)
  • Put out more fresh water than usual because standing water is probably contaminated.

What to do once you’ve found the cats

  • Check the cats for injuries or illness as thoroughly as you can. (You may only be able to examine the community cats by watching them.)
  • Trap injured or sick cats as soon as possible and get them medical care. If you need help paying for their medical care, use our community-cat resources map to find one near you or consult our “Having Trouble Affording Veterinary Care?” page.

 

 

If you have anything to add please comment.

 

Thank you!

Thankful Thursday

Today I am thankful for being able to take care of two new cats (and a dog!)

So this is a part introduction/thankful thursday.

Meet Harley. He’s a 12 year old service dog – he specializes in seizure alerts. He’s a lab and takes his job very seriously but when he is at home he is mostly cat as he loves to lay in sunspots.

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aura1

Meet Miss Aura. She’s 6 and just got up to date on her shots as of last week. She’s believed to be a Siamese/tabby mix. She’s very talkative and when she first came to the house she hissed at everything. Now she’s coming up on the bed wanting pets. She is front declawed (which I am highly against).

aura2

Meet Buttercup (aka Butters). She’s also 6 and just got up to day on her shots and received a “spa” treatment due to some mats in her beautiful long fur. She is very timid cat and I’ve just recently had the wonderful experience of her coming to me for pets. She is also front declawed.

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Now to my thankfulness, I am very thankful to have them under my watchful eyes as many of you know I simply adore my cats and they are more family than just pet. So I’ve spend plenty of time reassuring them that they are safe with me (there’s been some abuse in their past simply for being cat/dog) and will never go without care/love/food/shelter.

butters1

I will be keeping a close eye on the girls since they are front declawed, I’ve never had a declawed cat under my care before but I will be watching for limping or favoring their paws. Apparently the surgery was done when they were young and have had no complications since, but believe me it made me cringe to not only say it to the vets twice (they went to different vets as one could do the grooming and the other couldn’t) but to even think about what these poor girls went through during it.

 

I was of course worried about them holding their own against my cats, who have all their claws, but they seem to be doing well.

 

I am also thankful that having these additional pets under my care brought to light another issues I’m passionate about and that’s the anti-declawing campaign.

Declawing is a cruel and inhumane way to spare the cat owner’s furniture and to leave them defenseless if they ever get out of the house.

If you are interested in learning more about the cruelty of declawing please visit The Paw Project also please visit City the Kitty he’s a wonderful spokescat for anti-declawing.

 

Happy Memorial Day

Happy Memorial Day for all of us at Peace, Love & Whiskers.

Hope you have a wonderful and safe day and remember those who have died for our country.

minibittyusa

 

 

Animal Interviews: Meet Spootz

 spootz2

How old are you? 

13

Where did your name come from?

A puppet my mom’s Spanish teacher used to use in puppet shows to teach her kindergarten class Spanish stories

How did you end up in your forever home?

My mom saved me after her sister adopted my brother and sister a few months earlier. Mom’s sister would not let her play with the new kittens, and mom was a spoiled brat so she asked Grandma if she could get her own kitten and she came to get me.

Was it scary moving ?

I have moved twice- i was driven up to Massachusetts by Grandma with my brother Archy, my sister Sigmund, and by canine friend Ace. The car ride was rather loud but not scary. I was flown back to Florida later with mom. Besides peeing on her leg on the drive to the airport there was nothing scary about that part. The plane ride was very loud but mom and the flight attendants paid me lots of attention and told me how good i was being and how handsome I was.

What are your favorite things to do?

Meow, sit on mom’s lap, have my belly rubbed, sit on the porch with mom, catnip

spootz

What kind of food to you like?

Iams brand senior cat

Why do you like being on the fridge so much?

It gives me the best viewpoint from which to oversee my domain

Do you ever get lonely being by yourself?

I was lonely when i first moved back to Florida because i did live with my sister Sigmund back home but i have become quite independent and keep house when mom goes to work

spootz3

Now for some questions for your mom:

I know you were having a problem with Sir Spootz peeing on your clothes, how long has he done this? He has been doing this since he was moved up north- when he gets offended or if we have visitors for to long he will pee on something. Or the few times it has been too long since i cleaned his litter box